Archive for March 8th, 2012

Things Heard: e211v3n4

Good morning.

  1. Trends and criteria vis a vis Afghanistan.
  2. Our mostly dysfunctional government.
  3. Does anyone remember the kerfuffle over the refusal of communion to the lesbian in a Catholic church, turns out … there’s more to the story. I guess the story “Catholic refuses communion to a Buddhist” doesn’t have the same cachet.
  4. Woops.
  5. Consider this. (HT)
  6. For the Orthodox smartphone set.
  7. Zuh zuh zuh zooooooom. Or not.
  8. smooch.
  9. A taxpayer feel (not so) good story.
  10. Parasites.
  11. Mr Holder and liberties.
  12. So … if after all that you need a dose of really cute.
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    Links for Thursday, 8 March 2012

    October Baby
    “Every life is beautiful”

    From Brett Kunkle,

    Mark your calendars for March 23. That’s when a new movie, October Baby, will hit movie screens. I was able to preview the film last week and suggest you go see this one in the theater. I’ll be up front, it is a strong pro-life movie dealing head-on with abortion. But it was powerful and compelling, without being preachy. The message comes through loud and clear, but in a way that stirred my soul (yes, yes…I cried like 4 times — it was intense). And ultimately, the message is hopeful.

    Trailer here.

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    Tatts for Jesus! Except…
    these are done FOR Lent.

    From Joe Carter,

    Although Christians have been getting inked for centuries, the recent rise in popularity and mainstream acceptance of tattoos is leading many Christians to reflect on the meaning and prudence of the practice.

    “Nearly 40 percent of young adults aged 18-28 have tattoos now, which is more than four times the number in the Baby Boom generation,” noted Matthew Lee Anderson in his book Earthen Vessels: Why our Bodies Matter for our Faith. “While tattoos mark a desire for significance within a destabilized world, they are a live option for most young people precisely because we have not escaped the clutches of the consumerism and the individualism that are so often criticized.”

    From CNN,

    In a hip, artsy, area of Houston, a hip, artsy pastor is taking an unorthodox approach to Lent.

    He asked them to get tattoos. Specifically, he asked congregants to get a tattoo corresponding with one of the Stations of the Cross, the collection of images that depict scenes in Jesus’ journey to his crucifixion.

    Another member of Ecclesia, Joyce O’Connor, channeled her family when she was deciding what station of the cross to get tattooed onto her body. O’Connor, who has one biological child and two stepchildren, connected with the fourth station, Jesus meeting his mother.

    “I am a mother and in just a minuscule way can relate to how Mary must have felt,” O’Conner said.

    “The tattoo captured me and I love it,” she continued. “When I think of that image, I don’t feel tragedy or sadness because I know how the story ends and it makes me smile.”

    Permanent images on your body using Biblical imagery as a metaphor for what has happened in your life?

    It seems to me that this is nothing more than a carnal attempt at personalizing scripture or, in these cases, Biblical notions.

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    Could this be an Introvert’s weapon of choice for fighting smalltalk?
    From Engadget,

    Silence is golden, so there are plenty of times when it’d be awfully convenient to mute those around us, and a couple of Japanese researchers have created a gadget that can do just that. Called the SpeechJammer, it’s able to “disturb remote people’s speech without any physical discomfort” by recording and replaying what you say a fraction of a second after you say it. Why would that shut up the chatty Cathy next to you? Delayed auditory feedback (DAF) is based on an established psychological principle that it’s well-nigh impossible for folks to speak when their words are played back to them just after they’ve been uttered.

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    Postscript to the Open Letter to Praise Bands
    Excerpts,

    1. Worship is not only expressive, it is also formative. It is not only how we express our devotion to God, it is also how the Spirit shapes and forms us to bear God’s image to the world. This is why the form of worship needs to be intentional: worship isn’t just something that we do; it does something to us. And this is why worship in a congregational setting is a communal practice of a congregation by which the Spirit grabs hold of us. How we worship shapes us, and how we worship collectively is an important way of learning to be the body of Christ…

    2. Because worship is formative, and not merely expressive, that means other cultural practices actually function as “competing” liturgies, rivals to Christian worship. …The point is that such loaded cultural practices are actually shaping our loves and desires by the very form of the practice, not merely by the “content” they offer. If we aren’t aware of this, we can unwittingly adopt what seem to be “neutral” or benign practices without recognizing that they are liturgies that come loaded with a rival vision of “the good life.” If we adopt such practices uncritically, it won’t matter what “content” we convey by them, the practices themselves are ordered to another kingdom. And insofar as we are immersed in them, we are unwittingly mis-shaped by the practices.

    Read it all.

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    Yes, conservative women do get more of the “Rush-treatment”

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    Heh. Funny. Very funny.

    030612
    © Day by Day

    I would have never thought of this, but then, I have a difficult time understanding the entitlement mentality.

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